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Green Party manifesto 2019: A summary of key policies

Green Party manifesto 2019: A summary of key policies The Green Party has revealed the details of its general election manifesto, titled If Not Now, When? The party has announced 10 new laws that would be ready to be implemented if co-leaders Sian Berry and Jonathan Bartley won an against-the-odds majority on Dec 12. Here is an at-a-glance look at what is in the 89-page manifesto. Environment The manifesto pledges a £100million-per-year investment plan to deliver a Green New Deal over the next 10 years. It would look to totally overhaul the use of fossil fuels by switching transport and industry to renewable energy sources, while upgrading household heating systems and planting 700 million trees within a decade. The party wants to use the measures to create a net-zero carbon economy by 2030. Brexit The pro-European Union party has re-committed itself to a second referendum and to campaign for Remain. It says staying in the bloc would help "lead the fight against the climate emergency". General Election 2019 | Key questions, answered Crime Restorative justice would be expanded to allow those affected by crimes to meet offenders as part of a bid to cut the prison population by 50%. Misogyny would be made a hate crime under a Green-led administration and the personal use of drugs, including some Class A substances, would be de-criminalised. Heroin would be available on prescription and cannabis clubs would be permitted, allowing marijuana to be grown and consumed by adults. Welfare The Greens would introduce a universal basic income, providing every UK citizen with £89 per week in state funding. It would provide a boost to those in work and leave no-one on benefits worse off, according to the manifesto. Health Party leaders have promised to increase funding for the NHS by at least £6 billion each year until 2030 - a 4.5% increase on the 2018/19 budget. Privatisation in the NHS would also be abolished, while mental health care would be put on an "equal footing" with physical care. Education The party pledges to boost education funding by at least £4 billion per year and to lay down a long-term aim of reducing classes to 20 pupils and below. Ofsted would be replaced with a "collaborative system of assessing" schools and a new law would put onus on teaching children about climate change. In higher education, tuition fees would be scrapped and those who paid £9,000 a year to study would have their debt wiped. General election 2019 | Manifestos


Germany’s Altmaier Tries to Defuse Row Over U.S.-China Comments

Germany’s Altmaier Tries to Defuse Row Over U.S.-China Comments (Bloomberg) -- German Economy Minister Peter Altmaier sought to clarify comments he made about the threat of U.S. and Chinese espionage, which the U.S. ambassador to Germany labeled an “insult” to American troops stationed in the country.Altmaier on Sunday defended the government’s decision not to ban China’s Huawei Technologies Co. from Germany’s fifth-generation mobile networks, saying it didn’t issue a “boycott” of American companies in the wake of espionage accusations against the U.S. around 2013.Ambassador Richard Grenell responded with a statement Monday saying that “there is no moral equivalency between China and the United States and anyone suggesting it ignores history.”Altmaier, a close ally of Chancellor Angela Merkel, said he was not suggesting that the political systems in the U.S. and China are “on the same level.” He made the original comments during a talk show on ARD television late Sunday that focused on whether China can be trusted.“It’s clear that we want the highest possible security standards for sensitive data, regardless of where the products come from,” he was quoted as saying in Tuesday’s Bild newspaper.Huawei’s role in Germany’s 5G networks has been a source of growing antagonism between Berlin and Washington, along with trade, defense spending and Russian gas.U.S. officials have stressed the risks of Huawei’s ties to the Chinese government and Merkel has faced pressure from her intelligence services and from her own party to keep the company out. She has insisted, however, that individual providers won’t be excluded unless they fail to meet security standards.To contact the reporter on this story: Iain Rogers in Berlin at irogers11@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, Raymond ColittFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Labour Makes Faith Vow After Rabbi Attack: U.K. Campaign Trail

Labour Makes Faith Vow After Rabbi Attack: U.K. Campaign Trail (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Labour is due to launch its race and faith manifesto just hours after the U.K.’s chief rabbi attacked Jeremy Corbyn’s record in dealing with anti-Semitism in the party. Writing in The Times, Ephraim Mirvis said “a new poison -- sanctioned from the very top -- has taken root” in the party and suggested Corbyn was not fit to be prime minister.Labour insisted Corbyn was a life-long campaigner against anti-Semitism, but this isn’t the kind of headline the party needs as it lags in the polls going into the final two weeks of the election.The Labour leader faces a TV grilling on the BBC on Tuesday evening.Must Read: U.K. Chief Rabbi Suggests Voters Should Avoid Corbyn’s LabourELEC for more on the U.K. electionComing up:Corbyn will launch the party’s race and faith manifesto in North LondonThe Liberal Democrats announce plans to expand the U.K.’s marine protected areasTuesday is the last day for British citizens to register to vote. They have until 11:59 p.m.The Polls:An ICM/Reuters poll released Monday put the Conservatives on 41%, Labour on 34%, Liberal Democrats on 13% and the Brexit Party on 4%.Here’s a summary of recent polls.Catching Up:Four Ways the U.K. Election Could Play Out for BrexitLabour, Tories Dig Up Old Attack Lines in Bid for U.K. PowerThreat to Raab Shows the Shifting Loyalties of U.K. VotersSNP leader Nicola Sturgeon told the BBC’s Andrew Neil that Scotland would look to rejoin the EU if Brexit happens.Remain voters will feel free to vote tactically as there’s no chance of a Labour majority, argues Rachel Sylvester in the Times.The Markets:The pound traded at $1.2896 early on TuesdayBloomberg Intelligence has taken a deep-dive into the risks and opportunities the 2019 election bringsThere’s now a 74% chance of a Conservative majority, according to odds offered by Paddy Power.(Adds story. An earlier version of this story was corrected.)\--With assistance from Dara Doyle.To contact the reporter on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Adam BlenfordFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Carbon markets pioneer Moura Costa buys back EcoSecurities from Mercuria

Carbon markets pioneer Moura Costa buys back EcoSecurities from Mercuria Pedro Moura Costa, a pioneer of carbon markets in the 1990s, and partner Pablo Martinez are buying back from Swiss trader Mercuria Energy Group Ltd the low-carbon projects' developer and carbon credit generator EcoSecurities, Moura Costa said. Brazilian Moura Costa started EcoSecurities in 1997, some months before the approval of the Kyoto Protocol by the United Nations Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The protocol, which included emission reduction targets for developed countries, triggered the development of carbon markets since countries could use carbon credits to help them to comply.


Four Ways the U.K. Election Could Play Out for Brexit

Four Ways the U.K. Election Could Play Out for Brexit (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.It will be no ordinary general election. Voters in Britain are now focusing their minds on the decision they will make in two weeks’ time. The result will determine not just the next government, but the fate of Brexit.From crashing out without a deal to holding another referendum and remaining in the European Union, the range of outcomes is still wide open. Here’s a guide to how it could all play out.Conservative MajorityResult: Boris Johnson’s Conservatives get more than 325 seats in Parliament.How We Got There: The polls were right. The Conservatives picked up seats in areas where Labour has traditionally been strong, and southern Tory voters decided they disliked Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn more than Brexit.What Happens to Brexit: Johnson moves swiftly to get his deal through Parliament -- perhaps even before Dec. 31. Every Conservative candidate has pledged to vote for it and, with his majority, the prime minister can rush it through the House of Commons. Britain leaves the EU by Jan. 31.Is Brexit Done? Of course not. Johnson then has 11 months to negotiate a trade agreement with the EU. That deal will be subject to parliamentary scrutiny, and the loyalty pledge Tory candidates have taken doesn’t cover it. Unless Johnson has a majority of more than 40, there’s a risk that rebel Tory MPs who favor a more decisive break with the EU will try to force him to back a harder Brexit.Set Your No-Deal Alarm For: Dec. 31, 2020.Little ChangeResult: The Tories are the largest party, but fall just short of a majority.How We Got There: Like his predecessor Theresa May, Johnson learned that Labour heartlands are hard for Tories to conquer. In the end, voters in those places decided they didn’t trust him. The seats in Leave-voting areas he did pick up were offset by losses in Remain-leaning areas.What Happens to Brexit: More of the same turmoil. Johnson refuses to step down, while the opposition parties fail to agree among themselves what should happen next. The New Year sees a potential stream of crisis votes in parliament -- to force another delay; to get Johnson’s deal approved; to hold a second referendum; or even to call another election. Meanwhile, the clock ticks down toward Britain’s scheduled exit on Jan. 31.Set Your No-Deal Alarm For: Jan. 31, 2020Labour In, But Who Leads?Result: The Conservatives have fewer than 300 seats, Labour loses ground too but enters government thanks to support from smaller parties. The Scottish National Party gets about 50 seats, the Liberal Democrats around 30, and a couple of former Conservatives running as independents somehow hold on.How We Got There: The Conservatives piled up votes in areas they already held, but didn’t win enough of the districts they needed to take from other parties. Johnson won seats from Labour in the middle of the country, though fewer than he hoped, and lost to the SNP in Scotland. Helped by some tactical voting, the Liberal Democrats made some advances against the Tories in the south.What Happens to Brexit: Expect another delay. Johnson is clearly beaten, but who replaces him? The Liberal Democrats refuse to put Corbyn in office, and urge Labour to select an alternative prime minister, an idea with which a lot of Labour MPs are privately sympathetic. Christmas sees a battle between Corbyn’s supporters and his detractors. In January, with some kind of alternative government in place, the focus turns to seeking another extension from the EU, this time to allow for a referendum.Set Your No-Deal Alarm For: Jan. 31, 2020, until the anti-Conservative parties have worked out who will replace Johnson.Prime Minister Jeremy CorbynResult: The Conservatives sink to 280 seats, and Labour rise to a similar level. Corbyn secures the support of the SNP by offering the Scottish nationalists another independence referendum and becomes prime minister.How We Got There: He did it. Corbyn staged a late surge in the polls, persuading voters that Johnson is untrustworthy and that the Conservatives were only interested in Brexit. Labour’s promise of more spending on public services didn’t just maintain the party’s share of the vote, it helped it to win over new supporters.What Happens to Brexit: Corbyn heads to Brussels to seek a deal that keeps Britain close to the single market. EU negotiators pull such a deal off the shelf, and Corbyn puts it to the British people in a referendum in June alongside the option of staying in the EU.Set Your No-Deal Alarm For: The next Conservative government.To contact the reporter on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Edward EvansFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Iran rejects US order to pay $180 mn over reporter's jailing

Iran rejects US order to pay $180 mn over reporter's jailing Iran on Monday rejected a US court order for Tehran to pay $180 million in damages to a Washington Post reporter for jailing him on espionage charges. Jason Rezaian spent 544 days in an Iranian prison before he was released in January 2016 in exchange for seven Iranians held in the United States. On Friday, a US district court judge ordered damages be paid to Rezaian and his family in compensation for pain and suffering as well as economic losses.


Labour, Tories Dig Up Old Attack Lines in Bid for U.K. Power

Labour, Tories Dig Up Old Attack Lines in Bid for U.K. Power (Bloomberg) -- Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn are tapping messages from past campaigns to boost their chances of victory in the U.K.’s Dec. 12 election.Johnson’s Conservatives on Tuesday said that Corbyn’s Labour, allied with the Scottish National Party, could end up spending 150 million pounds ($194 million) and the whole of 2020 on fresh referendums on Scottish independence and the U.K.’s European Union membership.Labour, meanwhile, unveiled a pledge card for pensioners including a 10.8 billion-pound package for social care, and said the Tories couldn’t be trusted to look after the elderly.At stake is the future direction of the U.K., with the two parties outlining vastly different visions. Labour’s platform involves six pounds of new spending for every one promised by the Tories and includes nationalizing broadband, the Royal Mail, the railways and energy and water utilities. Labour would also seek a new Brexit agreement that keeps Britain more closely tied to the EU than Johnson’s deal, with the prospect kept open of canceling the divorce altogether in a second referendum.Most polls give the Conservatives a double-digit lead, enough to win an outright majority. But U.K. electoral polls in recent years have proven unreliable, and with more than two weeks left of the campaign, there’s everything to fight for.‘Coalition of Chaos’The Tories are reviving the message of 2015 by underlining the threat posed by a possible alliance between Labour and Nicola Sturgeon’s SNP. Then, Tory warnings of a “coalition of chaos” between Sturgeon and Corbyn’s predecessor, Ed Miliband helped David Cameron to win a surprise majority.“A majority Conservative government would get Brexit done,” Johnson said in a statement. “The alternative is Jeremy Corbyn, a man who can’t even make up his mind on Brexit, submitting to a pact with Nicola Sturgeon, and we already know what terms she will demand - another divisive referendum on Scottish independence alongside a second vote on Brexit.”Corbyn, for his part, is tapping memories of the 2017 campaign when Labour branded then Prime Minister Theresa May’s social care plan a “dementia tax.” It ended up helping derail her campaign as she lost her majority in the House of Commons.When her successor unveiled the party’s manifesto on Sunday, there was no detailed plan on social care but rather a pledge to seek cross-party consensus. The Tories also promised to maintain an extra billion pounds of annual spending already announced for next year for the following four years.“The scandalous state of the care system is perhaps the biggest crisis facing our country,” Labour’s finance spokesman, John McDonnell, said in a statement. “Labour’s new pledge card sets out our offer to restore dignity and proper support for older people after being abandoned by the Conservatives.”As well as the additional spending on social care, Labour said on its pledge card late on Monday that it would restore 3,000 bus routes, retain free TV licenses and bus passes for pensioners, compensate 3.7 million women for changes to their pensionable age, invest in insulation for homes and protect mine workers’ pension plans.To contact the reporter on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Edward Johnson, Tony JordanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Russia is Going to Transfer Unique Construction Technologies to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Following President Vladimir Putin's Visit

Russia is Going to Transfer Unique Construction Technologies to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Following President Vladimir Putin's Visit This Fall, Russian President Vladimir Putin visited Saudi Arabia on a State visit. Following negotiations between President Putin and the King of Saudi Arabia Salman bin AbdulAziz Al Saud, over 20 documents were signed, including a Russia-Saudi high-level strategic cooperation program.


Citizen diplomacy spreads the best ideas America has to offer around the world | Opinion

Citizen diplomacy spreads the best ideas America has to offer around the world | Opinion Whether it be in Venezuela, Syria, North Korea or Ukraine, international events recently have sparked a lot of discussion about U.S. diplomatic engagement with other nations.


Oman Sees Path to Achieve Peace Between Saudis, Yemen Rebels

Oman Sees Path to Achieve Peace Between Saudis, Yemen Rebels (Bloomberg) -- Omani Foreign Minister Yousef Bin Alawi said he is optimistic that an agreement between Saudi Arabia and the Houthi rebels could be reached to end the four-year-war in Yemen.“There are consultations, there’s mediation and the desire to solve the conflict,” Bin Alawi told Oman’s state television after meeting with the Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in Washington today. ‘’Houthi leaders’ principle is to take the path of peace, security and stability, and I believe they will positively cooperate.”Pompeo and Bin Alawi agreed that only a political solution will bring an end to the conflict and ensure peace, prosperity and security in Yemen, the State Department said in a statement.The U.S. has begun efforts to find a negotiated settlement to the conflict, which has triggered the world’s worst humanitarian crisis with tens of thousands killed and millions left hungry and displaced.In September, devastating attacks on Saudi oil infrastructure highlighted the danger the Yemen conflict poses to regional stability. The strikes were claimed by the Houthis but Saudi officials and observers saw the hand of Iran, which is pushing back against a U.S.-led economic offensive to weaken the Islamic Republic.(Adds State Department statement in third paragraph.)\--With assistance from Glen Carey.To contact the reporter on this story: Zaid Sabah in Washington at zalhamid@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sebastian Tong at stong41@bloomberg.net, ;Lin Noueihed at lnoueihed@bloomberg.net, Jim SilverFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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